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Pee-Tee

I finally made it to see a physical therapist today, too.

The bike ride there was hilarious because I asked the Bossy Lady on my Smart-o-Phone to give me directions. Sometimes she has a hard time being articulate about what a person is supposed to do on a bike trail, and on a couple of occasions she got so fed up that she gave up. Also, it's much harder to hear her while out in the open air as opposed to inside a box (car). I managed to find the place in time for my appointment, but I'll be scrutinizing that map for some back routes because the intersection of 27th Street and Superior St was not conducive to pleasant cycling.

The PT's diagnostics were interesting but great. He checked my lower back for mobility and strength (no problems there, Mom), and my hips as well, and pinpointed a weak gluteus medius and tight hamstring as the most likely culprits in my troubles (which reminds me, I'm supposed to be stretching that right hamstring at least 5 times a day. *pauses to stretch hamstring*).

I showed him the stretches and exercises I'd been doing already, and he gave me three new stretches and exercises to add to the regimen. I still feel like the world could benefit from a general stretching and strengthening toolbox book that would prevent the major causes of these kinds of complaints, but for the time being I'm relieved to be getting these things sorted out. I'll go back one more time in a week to assess progress.

I am concluding that a trip to the physical therapist can be tremendously beneficial for sorting out these kinds of troubles, given the PT's expertise in diagnostics and the resulting ability to effectively target the source of the troubles. I suspect my mother would agree.

Comments

( 8 remarks — Remark )
pigshitpoet
Jul. 18th, 2015 03:35 am (UTC)
i think riding your bike is better therapy thank seeing a physio
rebeccmeister
Jul. 20th, 2015 05:01 pm (UTC)
The only thing is that bicycling is a fixed repetitive motion, and those can tend to lead to muscle imbalances and injuries unless supplemented with other exercises. That's my story and I'm sticking to it! :-)

(this story is largely informed by a couple decades of rowing experience, which is my REAL therapy)
pigshitpoet
Jul. 21st, 2015 05:32 am (UTC)
; )
mmm... that's too deep for me. maybe that's why i get muscle spasms?

i'm going to make some herbal tea..
jamesfduncan
Jul. 18th, 2015 03:43 am (UTC)
Links
Thanks for sharing links! Jim Duncan
rebeccmeister
Jul. 20th, 2015 04:59 pm (UTC)
Re: Links
You are most welcome! The link with the series of four videos is particularly informative for how to think about these kinds of muscle imbalances. The PT I saw showed me a different set of stretches and exercises as compared to the ones in the links and what I've mentioned previously, but I think it's best to get that level of detail directly from an expert.
(Anonymous)
Jul. 19th, 2015 04:04 am (UTC)
PT appointment
Glad you made it! Seems like even before this appointment you had improved quite a bit since the beginning of June. "Mechanical tune-up" with the hamstring and medius work should put you in great shape to take on the PBP!
~Mom
rebeccmeister
Jul. 20th, 2015 04:57 pm (UTC)
Re: PT appointment
Yes, things have been slowly but steadily on the mend ever since that Iowa 300k, supporting my notion that sitting in a car and driving immediately after a brevet was the most Terrible Idea. S has remarked that it always feels good to walk around a lot after one of these big bike rides, so I am building that notion into my general recovery scheme, too.

It didn't hurt to make the effort to go and see the PT, especially for the peace of mind, and to go over some basic diagnostics to pinpoint gluteus medius weakness as an underlying (and common) issue. The correct diagnosis made it easier to find my own resources and more information online.
( 8 remarks — Remark )

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