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Time travel II

Last fall I blogged about teaching students about the history of life on Earth, and how I inevitably thought of my father while walking through Earth's history. The reason why is because somewhere around 20 years ago, my father became interested in what he refers to as the Universe Story, which is an idea that seeks to celebrate the incredible miracle that is life on Earth in the context of our current understanding of the origins of the universe at large.

As part of his end-of-life services, my father sought to hold three days of Cosmic Celebrations while he lies in state at home. [personal profile] scrottie and I arrived today in time to participate in the second one today. These are being led by very good friends of his with whom he had been engaged in a long-term conversation (10-plus years) about the nature of the existence of life on Earth and how to bring religious and scientific perspectives into successful conversation with each other.

Right now, for me, the idea of time travel remains salient. Around the time when I was teaching students about the history of life on earth, I also wound up reading about recent discoveries of microbes living deep in the Earth's crust, which shakes up our fundamental concept of what things are necessary for life. A component of this is that some such microbes operate on a very different timescale from ourselves, distinct from what people had previously thought was typical or possible for living organisms.

So while I cannot bring myself to believe in many of the prior conceptions of what happens to a person after they have died, I do find some comfort in thinking about death as a transition into a different phase of time travel.

This entry was originally posted at https://rebeccmeister.dreamwidth.org/1285183.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

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